Stalingrad

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Reviews:
Liam Lacey(Globe and Mail): Overall, Stalingrad is a odd concoction, part Putin-era patriotic thorax-thumping and part creaky war melodrama, tot~y set in a superbly recreated ruined city.
Steven Rea(Philadelphia Inquirer): Stalingrad is all a~ and operatic, but its message is unmingled enough: War is hell, but moral agony, it makes for good cinema.
Stephen Whitty(Newark Star-Ledger): To signal a flag, sing a song and laud it as the uncomplicated and necessary victory of good over evil is the be in harmony with of easy message only an intelligent propagandist – or a president for life – could absolutely cheer.
Peter Howell(Toronto Star): Stalingrad largely succeeds in sensory stipulations but doesn't fare thus well in dramatic ones.
Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): A film that seeks to memorialize by benumb force.
Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): Though plenitude of road-tested war truths not far from sacrifice, honor, grit and intimacy finish trotted out, "Stalingrad" is engrossed down a spectacle campaign forged in operatic acuteness and a siege of the senses, and up~ those terms it has its moments.
James Kendrick(Q Network Film Desk): under which circumstances the narrative encourages a sense of philosophical censure about the horrors of war, the pellicle's video-game-inspired appearance constantly puts us at a degree of remoteness by overly aestheticizing the violence with extreme slow motion and bullet time furniture
Jeff Beck(Examiner.com): Stalingrad is a thin skin that is completely lacking in substance, not only on the basic storytelling on a par, but also on the human level.
Todd Jorgenson(Cinemalogue.com): The film isn't as concerned through history as it is with mature combat sequences featuring slow-motion bullets and carnage more befitting a video game.
Kelly Vance(East Bay Express): Sprawling, extremist-violent, carefully plotted, masterfully constructed Russian narrative.
Julian Roman(National Post): Stalingrad embraces technology to acknowledge this bloody tale, but also paints a assuming, nationalistic portrait of the terrible sacrifices made ~ means of civilians and soldiers.
Kristy Puchko(CinemaBlend.com): Its fiction is captivating, punctuated with performances that are persuading and mesmerizing. Its action is shattering and sensational. Stalingrad is spectacular.
Robin Clifford(Reeling Reviews): The technical expertness in making the battle scenes in the same state convincing, for me, is the real draw to see the new "Stalingrad."
Jesse Hassenger(AV Club): Too often does [Bondarchuk] goad his characters to border over with righteous bloodlust-and, contemptuous opposition the occasional obligatory misgiving about the savagism of war, goads the audience to eagerness to possess right along with them.
Bilge Ebiri(Vulture): If you purpose Saving Private Ryan needed to subsist more like 300, then Stalingrad is the movie in spite of you.
James Verniere(Boston Herald): IMAX 3D trial is war as death metal concordance with HD visuals. Pretty spectacular, unruffled if everything else is mediocre.
Tara Brady(Irish Times): The ~tled design and the effects are genuinely powerful, and even the least nuanced scenes are not exclusively of their mushy charms.
David Kaplan(Kaplan vs. Kaplan): "Stalingrad" is surpassingly impressive in IMAX and 3-D, placing us have a tincture in the middle of a arbitrament of the sword-like environment. From that standpoint, the thin skin succeeds.
Chris Bumbray(JoBlo’s Movie Emporium): Melodramatic further often visually striking, One of the with most propriety uses of 3D in film as AVATAR.
Glenn Kenny(RogerEbert.com): I'd commend it just for the window it provides into approved entertainment on the other side of the earth.
Harvey S. Karten(Film Journal International): Patriotism, loftiness, and fireworks trump psychological character unravelling, and that's not a vile thing.
Matt Prigge(Metro): Much of it feels like 'Nation's Pride,' the Nazi propaganda pastiche screened during the climax of 'Inglourious Basterds.'